lucyswanson

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Lucy Swanson
lucyswanson@arizona.edu
Phone
520-621-4452
Office
576 Modern Languages
Office Hours
Tues 2-3pm & Thurs 12:30-1:30pm
and by appointment
Swanson, Lucy
Associate Professor

PhD, University of Pennsylvania (2012). Dr. Lucy Swanson worked at Haverford College and Lafayette College before coming to the University of Arizona as Assistant Professor of French and Caribbean Studies. Her research examines how historical narratives and political discourse are reflected in recent francophone literary and visual culture, particularly that of Haiti and the French Antilles. Dr. Swanson’s articles have appeared in Cincinnati Romance Review, International Journal of Francophone Studies, and SITES: Contemporary French and Francophone Studies. She is the author of The Zombie in Contemporary French Caribbean Fiction (Liverpool University Press, forthcoming March 2023), which explores how contemporary writers and artists reinvent the iconic folkloric figure. Listen to her speak about her book here: https://newbooksnetwork.com/the-zombie-in-contemporary-french-caribbean-fiction

 

Recent Publications

Articles and Chapters 

“(Re-)Framing the Midwife: Female Resistance and Discursive Agency in Évelyne Trouillot’s Rosalie l’infâme,” Journal of Haitian Studies 28, no. 2, Fall 2022: 142-165.

“Magical Thinking in Chamoiseau’s Chemin-d’école: From Quimbois to the Mission civilisatrice,” Small Axe 63 (vol. 24, no. 3), November 2020: pp. 16–30.

‘“La Sorcellerie du savoir-faire technologique’: Sorcery and Knowledge in Kourouma’s Monnè, outrages et défis (1990).” Contemporary French & Francophone Studies: SITES 20.4-5, 2016: pp. 632-639.

“De retour d’entre les morts (encore). [Back from the Dead (Again): Zombies and the Spatial Imaginary in Contemporary Haitian Fiction].” In Z pour Zombies, eds. Samuel Archibald, Antonio Dominguez Leiva and Bernard Perron. Montreal: Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 2015: pp. 101-113.

“Blankness, Alienation, and the Zombie in Recent Francophone Fiction.” International Journal of Francophone Studies 17.2 (June 2014): pp. 177-197. 

“Digging Up the (Living) Dead: The Roots of Antillanité and Créolité.” In Antillanité, créolité, littérature monde. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013: pp. 137-147.

“Zombie Nation?: The Horde, Social Uprisings and National Narratives.” Cincinnati Romance Review 34 (Fall 2012): n.p. http://www.cromrev.com/volumes/vol34/002-vol34-swanson.pdf

Translations

“André Martin, Inventor of Animation Cinema: Toward a History of Terms,” Hervé Joubert-Laurencin (translation). In Animating Film Theory, ed. Karen Beckman. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2014: pp. 85-96.

“The Twelfth Floor” and “Blood and the Sea,” dramatic excerpts by Gary Victor (translation). Performed at the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, The City University of New York Graduate Center, November 12, 2012.

Currently Teaching

FREN 310 – Spoken French in Cultural Context

This course is focused almost exclusively on oral communication. The course fosters open-mindedness through informed discussion of commonalities and differences between American and French/Francophone cultures. It enables students to sharpen their oral communication skills.

FREN 447 – Topics in Francophone Studies

A content-based course designed to help students gain a better sense of the Francophone world through the focused examination of a particular issue or topic. The topic of each course varies according to the faculty's expertise.

FREN 547 – Topics in Francophone Studies

A content-based course designed to help students gain a better sense of the Francophone world through the focused examination of a particular issue or topic. The topic of each course varies according to the faculty's expertise. Graduate-level requirements include more emphasis on research, theory, and criticism, and more substantial assignments in terms of length and quality.